Valve Magazine


Last updateFri, 09 Oct 2015 2pm

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Coatings can Make a Difference in Wastewater

15 sum wastewater introIn Episode 23 of the Discovery Channel’s “Dirty Jobs,” Mike Rowe had the task of pulling a submersible wastewater pump from a lift station for inspection and cleaning. His exposure to fumes, sewage and sludge while accomplishing this task undeniably demonstrated the need to reduce maintenance and repair in the wastewater industry wherever possible. The images conveyed showed how messy wastewater equipment can get and why costly downtime occurs in this industry.


Understanding and Selecting Valve Flanges, Pt. I: Design and Standards

14 fall flanges introFrom time to time, we are re-posting particularly well-received articles that have previously run on so that those who might have missed them will be able to catch up on the best of the best. This article, Understanding and Selecting Valve Flanges, Pt. I: Design and Standards, was Number 2 on our Top Ten online Stories of 2014 and initially ran on November 14, 2014.

Because flanges allow the assembly and maintenance of system components without the need for cutting and welding pipe, they play an important role in piping systems. However, the structural integrity and leak tightness of waterworks piping systems are only as strong as the weakest element, which often is the flange connection between various valves and fittings. Yet because piping systems are subject to many types of loads and are constructed of a variety of materials, understanding and predicting the rating and performance of those flange connections is difficult. This is further complicated by the fact that different sealing mechanisms such as gaskets, O-rings and mechanical seals can significantly affect the performance of the connections. As far as ratings, ASME B16.1 lists pressure ratings for Class 125 flanges from 50 to 200 psig depending on size, material and temperature. 


The Current State of R&D in the Valve Industry

15 sum rand 1As valve end-user industries become more complex and demanding, manufacturers and suppliers must develop and find better, more efficient products to do the work. For that reason, resources are increasingly allocated to the research and development (R&D) teams that can create the technologies needed.


Additive Manufacturing: Will It Change the Valve Industry?

15 spr additive 1Additive manufacturing (AM), also called 3D printing, is likely to transform the production of physical goods, including valves and actuators, in the same way the Internet drastically changed the information business model. It is now possible through AM to manufacture goods at locations where they are needed rather than where labor costs are lowest. That kind of model could change the concept of “just-in-time delivery” to “just-in-time manufacture where it is needed.”


Turning Back the Tides of a Truly Super Storm

15 spr sandy 1Superstorm Sandy made landfall Oct. 29, 2012 on the eastern seaboard of the United States, resulting in unprecedented flooding in the New York City metropolitan area. Flood levels zoomed past the previous record of 10 feet in the southern portion of Manhattan to reach 14 feet, and wave heights in New York Harbor were measured as high as 32 feet.


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Valve Magazine Digital Edition

Valve Magazine Summer 2015Inside the Summer 2015 issue…

• Critical Service
• Effects of Flashing/Cavitation
• Coatings and Wastewater Apps
• The Latest in R&D