02192018Mon
Last updateFri, 16 Feb 2018 8pm

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Putting Servo Valves Back to Work

Putting Servo Valves Back to Work

Industries as varied as paper production...

Corrosion and Fouling: Is There a Solution?

Corrosion and Fouling: Is There a Solution?

According to a 1998 study released by the ...

Valves with All the Trimmings

Valves with All the Trimmings

The term valve trim has been around for ...

VMA Chair Mark Nahorski: Industry Has Many Pathways to Success

VMA Chair Mark Nahorski: Industry Has Many Pathways to Success

Part of the discussion today about what ...

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Industry Headlines

ValvTechnologies ITC 2018 Recap

Friday, 16 February 2018  |  Chris Guy

The biennial ValvTechnologies’ International Technical Conference and Users Group (ITC) was held on February 8-9 in Houston. Seeking to educate,...

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Putting Servo Valves Back to Work

Putting Servo Valves Back to Work

Monday, 12 February 2018  |  Christopher Valiquette

Industries as varied as paper production, steelmaking and power generation rely on servo valves for precise motion control. A servo valve can last wel...

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Industry Headlines

ValvTechnologies ITC 2018 Recap

2 DAYS AGO

The biennial ValvTechnologies’ International Technical Conference and Users Group (ITC) was held on February 8-9 in Houston. Seeking to educate, inspire and engage attendees over a two-day period, the event brought together hundreds of attendees from across the globe to share valuable insight ...

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Matthew Davis Named Field Service Manager at Weir

3 DAYS AGO

Weir Valves & Controls USA (WVC USA) has appointed Matthew Davis to the position of field service manager. In his new role, Davis will be responsible for managing the WVC USA Field Service crew and organizing WVC Service jobs for power plants worldwide.

Davis joins WVC USA with over 20 years of ex...

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TransCanada Turns Attention to Natural Gas System

3 DAYS AGO

TransCanada Corp. will move forward with a $1.9 billion expansion of its NGTL System to connect incremental supply and expand basin export capacity by one billion cubic feet of natural gas per day at the interconnection with its Canadian Mainline. NGTL expects to begin construction in 2019.

The increme...

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U.S. Oil Output Surge Reminiscent of Run-Up to 2014 Dive

4 DAYS AGO

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), fast rising production in non-OPEC countries, led by the U.S., is likely to grow by more than demand in 2018. For now, the upward momentum that drove the price of Brent crude oil to $70/bbl has stalled; partly due to investors taking profits, but a...

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U.S. Industrial Production Fell 0.1% in January

2 DAYS AGO

Industrial production edged down 0.1% in January following four consecutive monthly increases. At 107.2% of its 2012 average, total industrial production was 3.7% higher in January than it was a year earlier.

Manufacturing output was unchanged in January for a second consecutive month; the index has i...

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U.S Business Inventories Rose 0.4% in December

3 DAYS AGO

Manufacturers’ and trade inventories, adjusted for seasonal variations but not for price changes, were estimated at an end-of-month level of $1,902.2 billion, up 0.4% from November 2017 and were up 3.2% from December 2016.

A poll of economists “had forecast inventories, a key component of...

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A Case for Mechanical Temperature Control

vmwnt12_beyond_valves_fig1Instrument, mechanical or project engineers may see a multitude of temperature applications cross their desks. Their immediate reaction might be to employ a temperature control loop. But could a mechanical, self-operated temperature regulator be a better solution for the valve application?

When approaching a temperature control application, the engineer usually considers:

  • The degree of accuracy needed
  • Whether the application requires feedback (Are limit switches/output signals used?)
  • Whether the application needs to be controlled through a DCS, PLC or other type of controller
  • The budget for the application.

The answer to whether a mechanical temperature regulator might be a cost-effective and reliable solution for the application depends on those considerations.

In almost any process facility, a variety of temperature control applications can be found. As with any controlled variable, both the accuracy and criticality of those applications can vary widely. Often, non-critical temperature applications become instrumented control loops even when a self-operated or mechanical regulator could provide the desired accuracy along with a substantial cost savings.


WHAT’S CONSIDERED

vmwnt12_beyond_valves_fig1Figure 1. Temperature regulatorA typical temperature control loop ­(Figure 1) requires:

  • a temperature sensor
  • wiring and conduit
  • connection to a controlling device
  • a control valve (and sometimes a positioner and/or I/P converter, and an air-filter regulator)
  • plant air

A self-contained temperature regulator requires no power, no air supply or other expensive compo­nents to operate. Representative costs based on a 1-inch line size would be:

  • Temperature transmitter: $300-1,000
  • Temperature controller: $400-1,000
  • Control valve and actuator: $1,500-3,000
  • I/P converter: $200-350
  • Air set regulator: $100-150
  • Positioner: $500-2,000
  • Control loop total: $3,000-7,500
  • Temperature regulator: $500-2,500

Although designs may vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, most temperature regulators operate on the same principle. A premeasured amount of “fill” is drawn into the thermal system filling the upper diaphragm chamber, the capillary tube and most of the bulb. As the controlled temperature increases, the fill in the sensing bulb begins to vaporize and creates pressure on the sealed system. This pressure drives the valve stem, closing direct-acting valves or opening reverse-acting valves. By using different fill fluids, many different temperature control ranges can be offered for both cooling and heating applications—temperature ranges are readily available from -20° F (-29° C) to 500° F (260° C).

Applications for which these devices might be ideal include tank farms, large heat exchangers, heat exchangers with slow temperature changes, area heating/cooling (warehouse/maintenance shops) and steam tracing.

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