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Last updateFri, 06 May 2016 6pm

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Food and Beverage Processing

Food and Beverage Processing

When wandering the grocery store aisles,...

Variable Frequency Drives in Electric Actuators

Variable Frequency Drives in Electric Actuators

Electric actuators are vital for operati...

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Emerson Reports Second Quarter 2016 Results

3 HOURS AGO

Emerson announced net sales in the second quarter ended March 31, 2016 were down 9%, with underlying sales down 5% excluding unfavorable currency translation and an impact from divestitures of 2% each. As anticipated, oil and gas and industrial end markets remained under pressure during the quarter ...

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A.W. Chesterton Expands Training and Services Facility

1 DAY AGO

A.W. Chesterton Company has expanded its facilities north of Boston with a new valve emissions testing facility, an expansive industrial training center and an industrial equipment service location to support its New England‐based customers.

The New England Service Center expansion provides mechanical...

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Hydraulic Fracturing Accounts for Two-Thirds of U.S. Gas Supply

1 HOUR AGO

For decades, hydraulic fracturing had been referred to as an unconventional completion technique, but over the past 10 years it has become the technique by which most natural gas is produced in the U.S. Based on the most recent data from states, the U.S. Energy Information Administration estimates tha...

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Food and Beverage Sales Strongest in Four Years

23 HOURS AGO

The U.S. consumer packaged goods (CPG) industry registered its strongest growth in four years in 2015, and some of the biggest gains were achieved by companies targeting the fast-growing market for protein-rich foods and healthy, “mindful” snacks. These are among the findings of new resea...

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U.S. Added 160,000 Jobs, Unemployment Rate Unchanged

1 HOUR AGO

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 160,000 in April, and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 5.0% , the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Job gains occurred in professional and business services, health care and financial activities. Job losses continued in mining. Employme...

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Factory Orders in the U.S. Increased in March

1 DAY AGO

New orders for factory goods rose 1.1% in March after falling a revised 1.9% in February, thanks largely to an increase in demand for defense equipment, the Commerce Department reports. This March increase in new orders was higher than the 0.6% rise economists predicted.

Durable-goods orders rose 0.8%,...

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A Case for Mechanical Temperature Control

vmwnt12_beyond_valves_fig1Instrument, mechanical or project engineers may see a multitude of temperature applications cross their desks. Their immediate reaction might be to employ a temperature control loop. But could a mechanical, self-operated temperature regulator be a better solution for the valve application?

When approaching a temperature control application, the engineer usually considers:

  • The degree of accuracy needed
  • Whether the application requires feedback (Are limit switches/output signals used?)
  • Whether the application needs to be controlled through a DCS, PLC or other type of controller
  • The budget for the application.

The answer to whether a mechanical temperature regulator might be a cost-effective and reliable solution for the application depends on those considerations.

In almost any process facility, a variety of temperature control applications can be found. As with any controlled variable, both the accuracy and criticality of those applications can vary widely. Often, non-critical temperature applications become instrumented control loops even when a self-operated or mechanical regulator could provide the desired accuracy along with a substantial cost savings.


WHAT’S CONSIDERED

vmwnt12_beyond_valves_fig1Figure 1. Temperature regulatorA typical temperature control loop ­(Figure 1) requires:

  • a temperature sensor
  • wiring and conduit
  • connection to a controlling device
  • a control valve (and sometimes a positioner and/or I/P converter, and an air-filter regulator)
  • plant air

A self-contained temperature regulator requires no power, no air supply or other expensive compo­nents to operate. Representative costs based on a 1-inch line size would be:

  • Temperature transmitter: $300-1,000
  • Temperature controller: $400-1,000
  • Control valve and actuator: $1,500-3,000
  • I/P converter: $200-350
  • Air set regulator: $100-150
  • Positioner: $500-2,000
  • Control loop total: $3,000-7,500
  • Temperature regulator: $500-2,500

Although designs may vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, most temperature regulators operate on the same principle. A premeasured amount of “fill” is drawn into the thermal system filling the upper diaphragm chamber, the capillary tube and most of the bulb. As the controlled temperature increases, the fill in the sensing bulb begins to vaporize and creates pressure on the sealed system. This pressure drives the valve stem, closing direct-acting valves or opening reverse-acting valves. By using different fill fluids, many different temperature control ranges can be offered for both cooling and heating applications—temperature ranges are readily available from -20° F (-29° C) to 500° F (260° C).

Applications for which these devices might be ideal include tank farms, large heat exchangers, heat exchangers with slow temperature changes, area heating/cooling (warehouse/maintenance shops) and steam tracing.

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