07242017Mon
Last updateFri, 21 Jul 2017 2pm

i

Monitoring Valve Health via the Internet

Monitoring Valve Health via the Internet

Most valve end users are already using s...

Valves in Oxygen Service

Valves in Oxygen Service

In his presentation at VMA’s 2017 ...

Thermal Spray Coating

Thermal Spray Coating

Q: What are the pros and cons of us...

Ball Valve Repair 101

Ball Valve Repair 101

From time to time, we are re-posting wel...

Subscribe SUM17

FREE SUBSCRIPTION*

•  Print magazine
•  Digital magazine
•  VALVE eNews
Read the latest issue

*to qualified valve professionals in the U.S./Canada

The Weekly Report

New Products

  • ja-news-2
  • ja-news-3

Industry Headlines

LyondellBasell to Build the World's Largest PO/TBA Plant

Friday, 21 July 2017  |  Chris Guy

LyondellBasell has made the final investment decision to build the world's largest propylene oxide (PO) and tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) plant in the ...

Readmore

Loading...
Advertisement
i

Web Only

How to Choose the Best Rapid Prototyping Method

How to Choose the Best Rapid Prototyping Method

Tuesday, 18 July 2017  |  Kate Kunkel

As new products are designed, including valve bodies and the parts that comprise the finished valve, prototypes must be created. How that is achieved ...

Readmore

Loading...

Industry Headlines

Badger Alloys Joins VMA as Associate Member

5 DAYS AGO

This week the Valve Manufacturers Association (VMA) welcomes Badger Alloys as an official associate supplier member. This is VMA’s fourth new member in 2017.

Located in the heart of Milwaukee and founded in 1966, Badger Alloys offers single source capabilities for custom castings. The company pou...

Readmore

Thermodyn Joins VMA as Associate Member

5 DAYS AGO

This week the Valve Manufacturers Association (VMA) welcomes Thermodyn Corporation as an official associate supplier member. This is VMA's third new member in 2017.

In 1979, Thermodyn began business with the dual purpose of selling A.W. Chesterton products and manufacturing high-temperature elastomers ...

Readmore

LyondellBasell to Build the World's Largest PO/TBA Plant

2 DAYS AGO

LyondellBasell has made the final investment decision to build the world's largest propylene oxide (PO) and tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) plant in the Houston area. The project is estimated to cost approximately $2.4 billion, representing the single-largest capital investment in the company's history...

Readmore

EPA Selects Projects for Water Infrastructure Loans

3 DAYS AGO

The EPA is inviting 12 projects in nine states to apply for Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA) loans. These potential applicants were selected from a group of projects that represent large and small communities from across the U.S. that submitted letters of interest to EPA in Ap...

Readmore

Leading Economic Indicators Increased in June

2 DAYS AGO

The Conference Board Leading Economic Index (LEI) for the U.S. increased 0.6% in June to 127.8 (2010 = 100), following a 0.2% increase in May, and a 0.2% increase in April.

“The U.S. LEI rose sharply in June, pointing to continued growth in the U.S. economy and perhaps even a moderate improvement...

Readmore

U.S. Jobless Claims Fall to Near Five-Month Low

3 DAYS AGO

In the week ending July 15, the advance figure for seasonally adjusted initial claims was 233,000, a decrease of 15,000 from the previous week's revised level. The previous week's level was revised up by 1,000 from 247,000 to 248,000. The 4-week moving average was 243,750, a decrease of 2,250 from t...

Readmore

Valve Live Loading Using Belleville Springs

The "live loading" of valve packing has been the topic of many articles and papers over the past few years. While highly recommended by some, others claim it has no value. The truth is both statements can be correct-it all depends on the individual application.

The problem is determining if a valve is a candidate for live loading. In most cases this can be decided by answering a few questions:

  • Is it a packed valve?
  • Does the valve cycle frequently?
  • Is it motor operated?
  • Is the valve difficult to get at?
  • Is the valve subject to high temperatures and pressures?
  • Is the valve in a critical application?
  • Does the valve have a history of packing leaks?
  • Does the valve have to be monitored under EPA regulations?

If the answer to the first question and any of the others is "yes," there is a good possibility the valve is a candidate for live loading.

Many different packing materials can and have been live loaded, but since the graphite-based materials are the most commonly used in live-load applications, the data referred to is based on these materials.

Live Loading
In its simplest form, live loading is the application of a spring load to the gland follower of a packed valve. A Belleville spring between the gland follower and its fastening studs and nuts provides an effective way to establish and maintain a controlled amount of stress in the packing set. The amount of the packing stress in a live-loaded system can be controlled by the size of the Belleville spring used and how far it is compressed or deflected. In a live-loaded packing system, the follower will continue to push against the packing even when packing volume is lost (by friction, extrusion, consolidation, etc.) The spring load will be slightly reduced as the springs expand, but this reduction in load will be much less than the load that is lost if the packing set was not live loaded. This remaining load allows the packing stress to remain at a level above the minimum sealing stress and enables the packing to remain leak free. There are many reasons why packed valves leak.

The most common problems are listed here, though some cannot be overcome by live loading alone:

  • Wrong packing material for the application.
  • Bent, scored, or pitted valve stems. No amount of spring load can overcome the damage these can cause to a packing set.
  • Improper packing installation. This may be the single biggest reason repacked valves leak. Graphite-based materials are not as forgiving as asbestos. These materials must be installed properly. This includes initially consolidating the packing by cycling the valve and retorqueing. This may take from as few as three to five times, to as many as 15 to 20. Installation procedures can vary from one packing manufacturer to another. Follow the manufacturer's procedures, whether the repacking is being done in house or by an outside contractor. The benefits of live loading are greatest when the packing has been installed properly.

Infrequent Use
A valve that is not used often, like an isolation valve, tends to leak when it has opened or closed after remaining unused for an extended period of time. What has happened is that the packing has consolidated over time, and the initial compressive load is reduced. Also, when the valve is actuated, additional compressive load is lost. If this reduction in packing stress falls below the minimum seal pressure, the valve will leak. Valves that fall into this category are not typically live loaded, but the addition of a single set of springs has been beneficial.

Frequent or High Cycles
When a valve is cycled, the packing around the stem wears. As the packing is lost, the stress on the packing is reduced. If left unchecked, the valve will eventually leak, which becomes very apparent on highly cycled valves, typically control and motor-operated valves. The normal method of overcoming this is frequent retightening of the gland follower bolts. Live loading can alleviate this stress reduction and eliminate the need for constant retightening.

High Temperatures, Pressures and Critical Applications
When valves work at high temperatures and pressures, they are usually in a critical application. Keeping these valves from leaking can be a difficult job. They are subjected to additional factors that make it harder to keep the proper stress on the packing set.

High temperatures can cause the gland follower bolts to creep or relax, which will reduce the stress on the packing set. High pressures usually mean higher packing loads, which can be difficult to maintain. Critical application usually means a need for a higher standard of safety. Live loading can be used to help eliminate these problems.

Maintenance Headaches
Valves that have been chronic leakers and valves that are inaccessible also are good candidates for live loading. Live-loaded valves require less packing maintenance, and the controlled load on the packing set may just help those chronic leakers.

EPA Monitoring

The Clean Air Act has made everyone take a closer look at packing leaks. If a valve has to be monitored, it must not only meet the EPA standard leak rate, but must be able to maintain that leak rate. Also, it must be able to do this without being adjusted. Controlled load on the packing set is essential in attaining this. Live loading may be the most cost-effective way to meet the EPA's standards.

Almost all of the major valve manufacturers, valve rebuilders, packing manufacturers, and packing distributors now have live-loading programs. Some are more complex then others, but all of them work basically the same way: Belleville springs are used to maintain the load on the packing set.

  • Latest Post

  • Popular

  • Links

  • Events

Advertisement

Looking for a career in the Valve Industry?

ValveCareers Horiz

To learn more, watch the videos below or visit ValveCareers.com a special initiative of the Valve Manufacturers Association