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Young Valve Professionals: Logan Moore

Young Valve Professionals: Logan Moore

In 2014, VMA's leadership created the Va...

VALVE Magazine: Readers' Choice 2017

VALVE Magazine: Readers' Choice 2017

Happy New Year to our VALVE Magazine rea...

Educational Opportunities Abound at New VMA Knowledge Forum

Educational Opportunities Abound at New VMA Knowledge Forum

From technical to manufacturing to human...

Offshore Production in a Low Oil-Price Environment

Offshore Production in a Low Oil-Price Environment

Three years ago, The Washington Post publi...

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Interior Coatings for Waterworks Valves

Interior Coatings for Waterworks Valves

Monday, 15 January 2018  |  John V. Ballun, P. E.

Since the 1990s, two types of epoxy coatings have been commonly specified and used for iron valves in the waterworks industry: fusion-bonded epoxy and...

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Industry Headlines

Velan Reports Third Quarter 2017/18 Financial Results

12 HOURS AGO

Velan Inc. announced its financial results for its third quarter ended November 30, 2017. Sales amounted to $87.7 million, an increase of $7.3 million or 9.1% from the prior year.

Net earnings amounted to $0.3 million or $0.02 per share compared to $1.5 million or $0.07 per share last year. After two...

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Emerson Named ‘Industrial IoT Company of the Year’

5 DAYS AGO

Emerson has been named the “Industrial IoT Company of the Year” by IoT Breakthrough. The IoT Breakthrough Awards, which received more than 3,000 nominations in 2017, recognize innovators, leaders and visionaries from around the globe in a range of IoT categories, including Industrial, Sma...

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Pipeline Capacity Expansions Accelerating in U.S. Northeast

11 HOURS AGO

With projects such as Columbia Gas Transmission’s Leach Xpress and Energy Transfer Partners’ Rover pipeline, “[t]he U.S. northeast should realize an increase of more than 3 Bcf/d of natural gas pipeline capacity by the end of this quarter, compared with an increase of 2.3 Bcf/d in ...

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EIA Forecasts Increasing Global Crude Production Through 2019

4 DAYS AGO

The U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) new Short-Term Energy Outlook forecasts Brent crude oil to average $60 per barrel (b) in 2018 and $61/b in 2019, slightly higher than the $54/b average in 2017. In both 2018 and 2019, EIA expects total global crude oil production to be slightly ...

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Texas Employment Forecast Calls for 3% Growth

5 DAYS AGO

Texas job growth is forecast to strengthen to 3% in 2018 from an estimated 2.5% in 2017, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas . The forecast means Texas should add about 366,000 new jobs in 2018. Texas added 305,900 jobs in 2017, ranking No. 3 in the nation for job growth after falling belo...

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U.S. Factory Orders Rose By 1.3% in November

7 DAYS AGO

New orders for manufactured goods in November, up five of the last six months, increased $6.5 billion or 1.3% to $488.1 billion, the U.S. Department of Commerce reported . This followed a 0.4% October increase. Shipments, up eleven of the last twelve months, increased $5.7 billion or 1.2% to $491.2 bi...

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Cast or Forged?

materials_q_and_a_graphicQ: Should I be concerned whether my valve is cast or forged?

 

A: Just as in politics, everyone has an opinion on this issue.

 

The good news is that both types of valves should be able to provide you with acceptable performance, although a perception exists that forged valves are superior to cast valves. However, if cast valves are made properly, they can and have worked equally well in a variety of services and usually at a much lower cost than forged valves. Also, the belief that forged components are infallible is not true. Let’s look at an example of a 4-inch diameter wrought valve stem in N07718 (Figure 1). A crack-like defect was seen on the end of the stem, so the part was cut in half, and the large shrink cavity you see here was discovered. This shows that forged material is not without its own problems. But let’s examine how cast and forged valves are made and how we can assure we get a good valve.

What most people don’t realize is that cast and forged valves start out the same way—molten metal is poured into a mold or ingot. As a result, both types can have defects such as the shrinkage in the above mentioned N07718 bar. Other defects associated with forgings are inclusions, laps, seams, cold shuts and cracks. Defects with common castings are inclusions, porosity, misrun and hot tears. As you can see, both have their potential issues.

An issue with forgings often overlooked is that forgings and wrought products will have non-uniform mechanical properties. This is because they are worked or formed more in one direction than in another. Therefore, the grains will be elongated more in one direction than in the other, which has a direct affect on mechanical properties, particularly impact strength. As a result, the design of forgings needs to take into account these anisotropic properties whereas castings have uniform properties no matter what the orientation of the test coupons.

Another advantage of cast valves is that they can be produced in more complex designs than forged valves. Certain valve designs such as a globe valve are simply difficult or impossible to produce as forgings. This flexibility of design in cast valves allows them to be more efficient in controlling flow than a similarly forged valve.

Something else to consider with forged valves is that they usually are made in halves, particularly the larger sizes. This means there is either an additional flanged connection that can be a potential leak path or the halves are welded together. Welding, however, is another process for cast metal that can have its own set of problems.

The questionable reputation that castings have is from two sources. First, most of the ASTM cast specifications are lenient in requirements for composition, heat treatment and inspection. Second, some foundries either use this latitude to their advantage or simply do not know enough to implement tighter controls when needed on chemistry or heat treatment. This concern about castings has resulted in equipment produced to ASME Section VIII having a quality factor on castings of 80% of the allowable stress values for a wrought component. However, this quality factor can be increased to 100% if sufficient NDE (non-destructive evaluation) per Appendix 7 is performed.

Casting purchasers need to understand that in most ASTM specifications these additional NDE requirements are not mandatory. They are simply listed as supplementary requirements at the end of the product specifications and are only invoked if included in the purchase order. Specifying additional NDE-like radiography or dye penetrant inspection is one way of helping ensure the quality of valves being purchased. However, a more cost-effective way is to deal with valve suppliers who already control the quality of the products they produce and have a long and successful track record. In either case, the decision to go with cast or forged valves depends on several factors, and cost is usually the determining one.


THOMAS SPENCE is director of materials engineering for Flowserve Corp. (www.flowserve.com), Dayton, OH. Reach him at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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