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Valves in a Cement Slurry Line

Valves in a Cement Slurry Line

Basically everywhere you look in modern ...

Triple Offset Butterfly Valves

Triple Offset Butterfly Valves

Since their introduction to the market m...

Digital Valve Control Leads to Increased Plant Availability

Digital Valve Control Leads to Increased Plant Availability

Surge is characterized by fast flow reve...

Cast vs. Forged: The Ongoing Debate Takes a New Direction

Cast vs. Forged: The Ongoing Debate Takes a New Direction

In the valve industry, the cast versus f...

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Industry Headlines

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Apollo Valves Combining with Shurjoint Mechanical Groove Systems

-1 DAYS AGO

Aalberts Industries, parent company of Apollo Valves, has acquired 100% of Shurjoint Piping Products USA, Inc., Haohan Metal (Kunshan) Co. Ltd. and Shurjoint Metals Inc., effective November 29, 2016. The acquisition will be led by Aalberts CEO Glenn L. Mosack and sr. vice president global sales and ma...

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Largest Canadian Ethanol Producer Wins Emerson Reliability Award

-1 DAYS AGO

Ethanol Greenfield’s Varennes, Quebec site won the 2016 Reliability Program of the Year at the Emerson Global Users Exchange in Austin. The site converts corn into fuel-grade ethanol, distillers grains, carbon dioxide and corn oil.

Emerson’s Reliability Program of the Year recognizes specif...

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Fitch: Energy Recovery Should Boost Chemical Companies

16 HOURS AGO

Modest reflation in the energy sector should filter through to higher prices for petrochemicals, plastics and other chemicals with energy-related feedstocks, resulting in higher sales, earnings and cash flow, according to Fitch Ratings . Market conditions support stable operating profiles for North Am...

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BP Approves $9 Billion Project in Deepwater Gulf of Mexico

19 HOURS AGO

BP has sanctioned the Mad Dog Phase 2 project in the U.S., despite the current low oil price environment. Mad Dog Phase 2 will include a new floating production platform with the capacity to produce up to 140,000 gross barrels of crude oil per day from up to 14 production wells. The $9 billion projec...

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ISM: U.S. Manufacturing Expands at Best Pace in Five Months

20 HOURS AGO

Manufacturing expanded in November as the Institute for Supply Management’s (ISM) Purchasing Managers Index (PMI) registered 53.2%, an increase of 1.3% from the October reading of 51.9%, indicating growth in manufacturing for the third consecutive month. A reading above 50% indicates that the ma...

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U.S. Adds 178,000 Jobs, Unemployment Rate at 4.6%

3 DAYS AGO

The unemployment rate declined 0.3% to 4.6% in November, and total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 178,000, the Department of Labor reported today. Employment gains occurred in professional and business services and in health care.

Employment in construction continued on its recent upward trend...

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Life-Cycle Costing

vmwnt12_lifecycleFor most of us, the purchasing process is relatively simple: Find the lowest cost for the desired item, make the purchase and then move on to the next task. However, the purchase price may only be the first installment of that cost.

Too frequently the simple, short-term view of looking at the price only results in a purchase that ends up costing much more over a period of time than the original price tag. What’s more, the entity doing the buying may be pulled back to revisit that purchase multiple times if the item fails prematurely, turns out to be less efficient than expected, requires more time to install or maintain than anticipated, or some other, unanticipated problem comes up.

In the 1960s, life-cycle costing (LCC) became popular as a means to evaluate the true cost of something over its entire useful lifetime. LCC seeks to quantify all costs associated with ownership. In addition to the initial cost, LCC commonly attempts to weigh factors such as the cost to install, maintain, repair, operate, replace, even dispose of an item, and depending on how comprehensive the analysis is intended to be, the list can include many more factors. As this shows, the final cost of an item is almost always much more than its purchase price.

But alas, LCC is not a precise process—its calculation can become so complex that it involves factors as scary as scientific calculations using probability theory, risk assessments and statistical analysis. The degree of use depends on how precise the LCC calculation must be. This is probably one of the reasons LCC fell out of favor. However, that attitude is changing; in this time of tight budgets and the need to wring every bit of value out of each dollar spent, there’s renewed interest in LCC.

Fortunately, LCC as a concept can be applied without having to deal with much of the complexity, which is what this article seeks to do. Those who want to complete a “true” life-cycle cost analysis, the way such analyses have traditionally been done, can find ample source material on the Internet to help them and provide guidance. Those who choose this path can search some of the following terms:

  • Life-cycle cost
  • Life-cycle cost analysis
  • Life-cycle cost summary
  • Life-cycle cost calculator
  • Water distribution life-cycle cost
  • Water system life-cycle cost

However, before deciding to engage in this comprehensive LCC analysis with all its complexities, the following concepts about LCC should be understood:

LCC is not an exact science. Despite the many scientific principles and calculations that can be involved, the result itself is almost always only an estimate. That’s because the only part of the LCC equation that is well-known and clearly defined is the procurement cost. All other data is estimated or assumed, with no guarantees that one factor will behave exactly the same as another when trying to quantify things such as performance or repair histories. LCC estimates, by the very nature that they are estimated, lack hard accuracy.

A detailed LCC analysis can require costly procedures to obtain needed data. The more accurate the LCC calculation needs to be, the more cost and time involved to develop the input data.

Although LCC can call for volumes of data, typically only limited data will exist.

LCC for a given item that comes from different sources, such as from a seller versus an end user, can differ significantly. This is because each party has a bias when selecting or establishing the input data.

“Something” is almost always better than “nothing.”

Despite these realities, including LCC concepts in the procurement process can result in a more cost-effective purchasing decision. Even when a comprehensive analysis is not done, it is good practice to inject LCC into the discussion for no other reason than to push the various purchasing influences towards a team-like approach to the procurement process. In other words, considering only the initial cost without LCC:

  • Designers or engineers might cut back on an item’s performance variables to meet a capital budget constraint that only considers initial cost.
  • The purchasing department might focus on the lowest cost thinking as the desired goal, when in fact operating and other costs might mushroom once a less capable item is put into service.
  • The operations department might assume an item will perform at 100% of its capacity and last forever when in fact almost nothing lasts that long.
  • The maintenance department might plan an optimistic maintenance or repair program to reduce preventive maintenance costs and meet short-term management goals.

Including LCC principles in discussions and planning can push out each party’s cost horizon and encourage a more realistic assessment of potential costs over a longer period of budget years.

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